Tag Archives: children literature

Book Review: “Anne of Green Gables”

Well, I missed our “introduction” post (where I introduce what book we’re reading this week…) but this week, for our second “Month of Romance” book for February, we tackled L.M. Montgomery’s children’s classic, Anne of Green Gables.

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Anne of Green Gables tells the story about a young orphan girl who is mistakenly adopted by a couple who wanted a boy to work on their farm. Anne overcomes her many problems – feeling unwanted her whole life, having a bit of a culture barrier due to not having a steady home – by using her vast imagination and great love for learning. In Anne of Green Gables, we see Anne grow, mature, learn, and love. The freckly, skinny, redheaded girl grows into a lovely young woman through the book, as we watch her personal relationships develop due to her spunk.

This book was recommended to me by a good friend (hi Alyssa!), and I have generally agreed with her along the lines of literature. Sorry, Alyssa, but this time, I’m not such a fan. Hear me out…

I did not like Anne. I’m sure there is a collective GASP across the Internet when I insult everyone’s favorite orphan (I’m a fan of Little Orphan Annie myself), but I just had a really hard time trying to like Anne. Am I sympathetic to her trials and tribulations? Of course. It breaks my heart to think of any child feeling unwanted (which was a major theme throughout this book, and a huge problem Anne faced). I couldn’t get past Anne’s superficial notions (her desperation for material possessions like puffed sleeves), as well as her overwhelmingly annoying (sorry, but it’s true) attitude toward – well – just about everything. I just couldn’t feel very loving toward the book’s main character (at least in her youth), and that just put too bad a taste in my mouth to overcome.

That being said – L.M. Montgomery was a fabulous writer. Her portrayal of physical things (scenes, clothing, people) were stunning, and poetic in many ways. Her novel was beautiful to read, even if I had a very hard time getting into the actual story. While I just spent a paragraph bashing Anne, I do appreciate Anne’s ability to adapt and overcome – her ability to imagine better for herself than what she had in reality. I think that is a wonderful and beautiful lesson to impart on children. Anne’s growth (by learning through her mistakes) is also a great lesson for young readers, specifically little girls.

This month’s theme is “romance,” and I did appreciate the budding romance between Gilbert and Anne. I can see why this book was a great launching point to read more about Gilbert and Anne’s romance. More than romance, however, the real love story seems to be Anne’s opening up the hearts of Marilla and Matthew, Marilla specifically. While Anne’s imagination and flightiness drove them crazy at times, they were able to see a little girl who needed their love, and open their home – and their hearts – to her. I think Anne was a great influence on the couple. Matthew’s character was my favorite by far, but it was rewarding to see Marilla open up to Anne’s love throughout the novel.

So, what do you think? Did I totally miss the mark? Do you hate me for not really liking young Anne? Are you going to try to encourage me to pick up the next novel in the series in hopes my mind will change? What are your thoughts?

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